You can choose a feature video from any of your uploads, or create a video specifically for this purpose. I recommend doing the latter; it allows you to create a short video (no more than 90 seconds, preferably) to welcome viewers to your channel and explain what you can offer them. This brief clip may not seem like a big deal, but in my experience it can go a long way in getting people to subscribe.
Engagement reports help you learn what content is resonating with your audience. Here you can see what viewers are clicking, sharing, commenting, and promoting. You can also see how your cards and end screens are performing in your engagement reports. Cards and end screens reports help you learn what your audience is engaging with so you can optimize your calls-to-action in future videos.
Target chose to group all their web exclusive content in one playlist and all their TV commercials into another. By grouping your videos together based on their topic, these videos are more likely to drive traffic between one another due to both usability and YouTube’s search algorithm. A user is more likely to watch a video of the same subject matter right after they’ve just watched a video on that topic.
It’s clear that video marketing is growing. It’s also clear that both marketers AND consumers want more of it. What might not be so clear is how easy and effective video marketing can be for businesses of all sizes. Hopefully, 73% of marketers are reading this because they’re about to find out why a lack of time, budget, or other resources do not have to slow down your video marketing growth!
Your suggested searches may include "clothes haul," "clothes hacks," "clothes diy," or "clothes shopping." That means people are searching for those terms, but it doesn't mean that you should add all of them. Only add the relevant search terms, or YouTube might dock you in their results or even remove your video completely. Same goes for adding tags into descriptions, which YouTube calls tag-stuffing.
I recommend that your account picture (which you set through your Google account) is some sort of brand logo. If you’re a one-person business, it can be a professional headshot of you. Ideally, it should match your profile pictures on other social media accounts for instant brand recognition. This works both ways; if ones of your followers from another site comes across your YouTube, you want them to recognize you so they’re more likely to watch. And, vice versa, if a viewer Googles you, you want them to be sure that the Facebook profile they’re clicking on is actually you. To change your channel art, just click on it when editing your profile.
Like anything else, it’s hard to know what success looks like if you don’t have goals to meet. Your goals will help dictate which platform to begin your video marketing efforts. Facebook, for example, is built for engagement and conversions and Twitter is best used to start a conversation and drive traffic to external sites. When creating your video marketing strategy, consider both the goal of the campaign and the best uses of the platform you’re distributing on.

Time spent watching a video is part of YouTube's algorithm. So if your title, tags, description, thumbnail, or category are misleading, it's unlikely that someone who clicks on your video will watch it for very long—once they realize it's not what they were looking for. If people only watch your videos for a few seconds at a time, the algorithm will notice and will demote your video in results.
Remember to include a number with each goal. This can change as you learn more but it’s always essential to make realistic and tangible goals rather than theoretical ones to monitor your success.  For example, how many more followers do you want? How much are you willing to spend per conversion? To make more informed objectives, check out industry benchmarks to see what numbers you should be reaching. Don’t be afraid to adjust your goals as you gain more experience.
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